Ram Laramie Crew Cab is fun to drive and has nicest interior on the market

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For such a massive rig, the Ram 2500 Laramie accelerates, handles, and stops extremely well.
For such a massive rig, the Ram 2500 Laramie accelerates, handles, and stops extremely well.

Once part of the Dodge product line, Ram is Fiat Chrysler Automobile’s truck brand, encompassing pickup trucks and commercial vans. Ram pickups have long competed with the mainstay trucks from General Motors and Ford. But the 2019 heavy-duty trucks, like the 2500 Laramie Crew Cab that I tested, are really quite impressive.

The completely redesigned Ram 2500 combines industry-leading hauling and towing capabilities with a very a comfortable ride and a welcoming cabin. And the available Uconnect infotainment system is excellent.

Part of the fifth Ram 2500 generation introduced for 2019, this heavy-duty line boasts stronger and lighter frame components and upgraded powertrains and transmissions. With my Laramie 4×4 test truck, the maximum payload is 2,520 pounds and max towing sits at 19,040 pounds. Both are impressive numbers, even among the admittedly strong competition.

When it comes to trucks, there is no one-size-fits-all. The Ram 2500 comes in several configurations with widely varying capabilities and specialties. There are three cab styles, two bed lengths, two engines, two transmissions, and six trim levels to choose from.

First there’s the bare-bones Tradesman, which is great as a work truck; next there’s the Big Horn/Lone Star, Laramie, Longhorn; and then we top out with the Limited and Power Wagon trim levels – offering the ultimate in road-trip luxury.

Cab styles range from a two-door regular cab to a four-door jumbo crew cab called the Mega Cab. But right in between was my Laramie’s four-door crew cab.

The Laramie builds off the Big Horn/Lone Star and adds more chrome trim (including the bumpers), a soft-closing tailgate, LED headlights and taillights, foglights, a 115-volt power outlet, power-folding auto-dimming mirrors, remote ignition, front and rear parking sensors, dual-zone automatic climate control, a 7-inch driver display screen, a power-adjustable driver’s seat, leather upholstery, driver-seat memory functions, a power-adjustable front passenger seat, heated front seats, and a heated steering wheel.

Already a class-leading heavy-duty pickup, available safety features are also a standout – such as adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, and forward collision warning.

Many upper-trim features are available on lower trim levels as part of packages or as stand-alone options. Base price for the model I tested was $52,259, but after adding a great assortment of the optional equipment, the price topped $78,500.

Those options included a the Towing Technology Group that included trailer reverse guidance, and cargo-view and surround-view cameras; the Black Appearance Package; and the $9,100 Turbo Diesel Engine.

My vehicle also featured the Laramie Level 2 Equipment Group, which offered such luxuries as a 17-speaker Harman Kardon premium sound system, ventilated front-row seats and heated second-row seats; Uconnect 4C navigation with 8.4 inch display and more.

I also have to say I was impressed with the fuel mileage at 20 to 23 mpg empty, and 12 mph pulling a loaded trailer.

Naturally, Chevrolet and Ford offer heavy-duty trucks of their own that offer stout capability as well. But if you’re shopping for a heavy-duty pickup truck, the 2019 Ram 2500 Laramie should be at the top of your list.

Grant Miller is the publisher of Miami’s Community Newspapers. He may be contacted by calling 305-662-2277 or via email at Grant@CommunityNewspapers.com.


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